RepUvue & Landing Pages

By: Courtney Martere

repuvue-logo

Last class I was fascinated by the importance of landing pages, and just how simple it is to confuse a person with your website. As easy as it to clutter your site, it’s just as easy to remove the excess information and create an efficient site for consumers to use.

One of the biggest mistakes of site design is that companies put ALL the information on the front page. It’s your business, so it’s natural to think that all information you provide is significant. However, business owners need to design their online presence through the lens of their customers. Why are people going to your site? What do people need from you? How can you teach the person what they need to know, quickly and efficiently?

I took these ideas and analyzed our product, RepUvue’s online presence. Considering they are a reputation management company, I would assume that their online presence is impressive. Creating a clear, attractive site is their specialty; this is what they help other business owners do. When I first looked up the site in the beginning of the semester, I thought it was crisp and aesthetically pleasing. After this presentation, I would make a few changes.

Let’s start with the home page.

Screen Shot 2017-03-29 at 1.32.16 PMWhen you look at this page, the two things that stand out the most are the yellow buttons. One offers a free reputation report, the other requests a demo. For starters, the presentation advised against using the word “free” to describe services, because then customers grow skeptical that something will cost money in the future. Secondly, the company should eliminate one button. Which service is more important? Also, what do they mean by demo? Maybe they should explain that process before highlighting it at the very top of their page.

Now let’s scroll…

Screen Shot 2017-03-29 at 1.42.23 PM

Screen Shot 2017-03-29 at 1.38.25 PM

Immediately below the homepage is this. My first thought: pick one. Text or graphic. Both explain the same thing, “what we do.” Personally, I would rather the more graphic-based section then the paragraphs of text. However, is it seriously necessary to include FOUR Learn More buttons (not including the one at the very end of the paragraphs)? My advice: ditch the text. Put ONE prominent Learn More button that teaches about all four services. I do like how the top bar stays in place as you scroll, though.

Let’s keep going.

Screen Shot 2017-03-29 at 1.45.03 PM

Screen Shot 2017-03-29 at 1.45.17 PM

The more you scroll, the more confusing it gets. My biggest question is, why are those buttons at the top of the screen there if the consumer can just scroll to see all that information? When you click those individual buttons, you are brought to separate, more detailed pages. Personally, I would eliminate those buttons to prevent repetition on the site. OR I would eliminate close to everything on the homepage and allow what’s behind those buttons to explain the rest.

Also, this is the main site, so I think the blog should have its own, separate landing page from this one. Right now there are sample blog posts towards the bottom of the homepage. I find this completely unnecessary and excessive.

And finally…

Screen Shot 2017-03-29 at 1.59.34 PM

I would ditch the links that match those across the header. The only information that should stay is the Terms of Service, company address and links to social media. I don’t believe a site map would be necessary if the site was easy to navigate. A Site Map link is basically an admittance that the website is difficult to understand. And the social media links? I wish I could see those before scrolling all the way to the bottom of the page. What is someone gets bored and never makes it to the bottom?

Right now, the customer is overwhelmed with too much information and too many courses of actions. If the company wants to keep everything on one site, they should use less buttons, simplify the home page and highlight one thing to do, like get a reputation report.

Website: RepUvue

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s